Evidence Is Mounting that Gas Stoves Are Hazardous to One’s Health

A study published last week in the journal Environmental Science & Technology found at least 12 hazardous air pollutants, including benzene, a carcinogenic, are being emitted by virtually all gas ranges.  The study, limited to California, included 159 stoves in 16 counties. It found benzene emitted from 99% of the sampled stoves. Here’s a link for that study.

Although the study did not include other gas appliances such as forced air furnaces and water heaters, it makes sense that the same pollutants are being emitted from those and other gas appliances, too.

Gas appliances are also a source of carbon monoxide, a poisonous gas, and carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, which is also unhealthy in high concentrations.

This report adds another reason why homeowners should consider abandoning natural gas (or propane) and moving toward having all-electric homes, especially now that there are widely available and efficient heat pump HVAC systems, heat pump water heaters, and induction cooktops. Rita and I have used all three of these appliances plus an electric grill, which we love.

Report Details How the Inflation Reduction Act Will Transform the Building Sector

One of the best analyses of the impact of the IRA on sustainability and the mitigation of climate change was released on Aug. 31st by the Rocky Mountain Institute. Below is a graphic from that report summarizing the IRA’s biggest direct impacts. Click here to view the full report.

As reported by Fast Company, the report “finds that the IRA’s main rebates and tax credits could bring electrification and energy-efficiency upgrades to millions of homes. In total, the bill’s new rebates and expansions of existing tax credits will create more than $23 billion in funding to electrify homes, upgrade heating, cooling, and ventilation equipment, and develop entirely new buildings that meet the highest federal standards for efficient energy use.” The IRA provides funds or rebates for:

Electric heat pumps that can both heat and cool your home, which the Department of Energy estimates will save families $500 to $1,000 every year. There’s a rebate of up to $14,000 for installing them.

Induction cooktops, which replace dangerous and health-harming gas stoves that contribute to asthma and other respiratory diseases.

Insulation, windows, doors, and sealing ductwork, which will ensure a home’s heating and cooling systems don’t have to work as hard to keep families comfortable.

Upgraded electrical panels and wiring for homes that have older electrical service.

The tax credits provided for in the IRA are available immediately, but the rebate program will take some time to be implemented, since it requires the creation of rules and forms.